Digitally Drawn versus Traditional Illustration in Books

In the early 90s, as an art director at Macmillan Publishing, one of the book projects on my list was the 1st edition of The Macmillan Visual Dictionary. What made this book stand out at the time were the visually consistent digitally drawn illustrations. When I first got to see the artwork being created on the computer, I remember being amazed. Quebec / Amerique International would send us interior proofs to look over. It was also a massive undertaking because it was such a huge book, with 3,500 color illustrations being created for the interior. Selecting the art that would…

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Branding at the Book Expo 2014

Walking around the Javits Center at the 2014 Book Expo, taking in the book covers, booth signage and branding of companies, some hanging down from the ceiling, one can be overwhelmed visually. But after all these years, I have selective vision. I can scan quickly and be stimulated by the less is more factor. Booths that had a barrage of books didn’t catch my eye, but there were a few booths that designed some terrific, large scale posters and your eye could take that all in. They were also positioned at an angle which helped to draw even more attention…

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Questions Authors Ask Designers – Part One – Book Covers

I’ve served as a panelist at quite a few book conferences, so I’ve heard many of the questions authors have about design topics.  In part one of this series, we look at book covers. “How can you make my cover stick out from the crowd so that it’s memorable, but in a good way?” First, we explore what the book is about, and who it is meant to serve. What is the topic/genre, and what has been done before? Were those books successful and whether yes or no, why? The cover is about advertising what’s inside. It cannot give everything…

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Website or iPad Gallery and the Printed Portfolio

Having your website portfolio updated and often is the key to gaining more traffic and leads. I know that I add content in graphics, email newsletters, and blogs on a consistent basis. By keeping the content fresh, Google will be kind and recognize those new samples. The more you update, the more you will see that important ROI. The statistics go like this: if you blog once a month you will see a 38% ROI, but if you change that to once a week, 58%. That’s almost double! (watch this important webinar on Marketing Tips) You can easily just show…

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